Art of Cities Conference, Vancouver, May 24-26, 2017 (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Art of Cities Conference, Vancouver, May 24-26, 2017 (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Had a fantastic visit with CityStudio to learn how their innovation hub is collaborating with City staff, faculty, students, and community to co-create experimental projects to make Vancouver a more sustainable and enjoyable city. A big thank you to the CityStudio founders Duane Elverum and Janet Moore, the CityStudio staff, students and alum, as well as the University Faculty members and City staff for sharing your stories and giving us such a warm welcome to Vancouver.

Jeanie Morton, Janet Moore and Duane Elverum share their story. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Jeanie Morton, Janet Moore and Duane Elverum share their story. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Many fruitful group discussions during the Art of Cities Conference in Vancouver. (Photo: CityStudio)

Many group discussions during the Art of Cities Conference in Vancouver. (Photo: CityStudio)

Jeanie Morton explains how she plays matchmaker between CityStudio, Faculty, City staff, Community organizations and students. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Jeanie Morton explains how she plays matchmaker between CityStudio, Faculty, City staff, Community organizations and students. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson gave us a warm welcome. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson gave us a warm welcome. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson shows his support for how  CityStudio is enhancing the city of Vancouver. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson shows his support for how CityStudio is enhancing the city of Vancouver. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Lisa Helps of Victoria also came out to show her support. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Lisa Helps of Victoria also came out to show her support. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Small break-out group discussions to share ideas. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Small break-out group discussions to share ideas. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Lunch meetings with City staff and University faculty to discuss their involvement with CityStudio. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Lunch meetings with City staff and University faculty to discuss their collaborative projects with CityStudio. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Learning from one another in break-out sessions. (Photo: CityStudio)

Learning from one another in break-out sessions. (Photo: CityStudio)

The City of Vancouver treated us to a tour of their new bike lanes. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

The City of Vancouver treated us to a tour of their new bike lanes. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Dale Bracewell, Manager of Transportation Planning, gave us an overview of Vancouver's walking and cycling goals. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Dale Bracewell, Manager of Transportation Planning, gave us an overview of Vancouver’s walking and cycling goals. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Great to be at a conference where you take a break to experience the city on two wheels! (Photo: CityStudio)

Great to be at a conference where you take a break to experience the city on two wheels! (Photo: CityStudio)

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Really nice use of natural light in this architectural installation by Marco Casagrande in Wenduine, Belgium. For more info and photos, check out this article in ArchDaily.

 

I’ve watched this classic film by Ray and Charles Eames several times over the years, and somehow it never gets old. Made in 1977 with only a fraction of the technology we have today, it still captures the essence of how complex and fascinating our universe really is.

Since a bit more than one fourth of the Netherlands is below sea level, we often forget how human interventions and machines (dams, pumps, etc.) have changed the natural landscape and altered the interaction between people and nature. Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde and his team at Studio Roosegaarde created Waterlicht, an installation of wavy lines of light composed of LEDs, software, lenses and steam machines to create a virtual flood and simulate waves and currents passing overhead. The installation is an interesting reminder of the delicate and constantly evolving interaction between humans and nature.

Waterlicht has been on display at the Museumplein from May 11-13, 2015. It was originally commissioned by the Dutch Water Board and was previously displayed in the flood channel of the River IJssel near Westervoort.

WaterLicht

The Future is Cities

The Future is Cities


I’m glad we’re moving more toward sharing and co-ownership of possessions slowly but surely (Uber, AirBnB, Bixi/Hubway, co-working spaces, etc.). It’s a win win for society and the planet without a doubt. As stats show, our cities will be accommodating exponentially larger population as we move forward and the numbers are only expected to continue to climb. Since we can teach our toddlers to get past the “Mine!” phase, I’m confident that we can too. Here’s a good read: The Future is Cities.

Winter Sun

Winter_Sun_2

Winter_Sun_3

Montrealers may well appreciate this type of installation smack dab in the middle of January or February (or even April at the rate we’re going). The following text is from the site inhabitat (Winter Sun art installation brings warmth and light to King’s Cross in London, by Lucy Wang, 12/08/14)

“Artists James Bowthorpe and Kim Coleman collaborated with architect Andrew Lock to design Winter Sun, a ‘hearth’-like art installation that doubles as a public gathering space with an open-air bar. The temporary structure illuminates the area with twelve glowing ‘suns’ that change brightness to emulate natural light.

An open-air bar located at the heart of the structure serves up hot and cold cocktails made from locally-sourced ingredients such as honey and winter fruits. Everything from the design of the bar to the uniforms fit the sunlight concept and was created using exposed light-sensitive materials.

“Humans used to celebrate mid-winter as the time of the year when the earth is furthest from the sun, anticipating its glorious return,” say the designers. “Winter Sun is a dose of man-made sun in the dark of winter.” The twelve glowing lights surrounding the public space endlessly dim and brighten to emulate the sun at different phases, such as daybreak or full sun. The installation was accompanied with a series of small themed events including Sun Printing and Shadow Shape making.”

LeGrandBalletI recently spotted a very cool project by Lucion Media for the Grands Ballets Canadiens. The dance company sponsored a fund raiser to help support their move to a new building, and Lucion Media created large scale projections for the occasion. The dancers appear on screen in wooden crates and become part of the visualization of the move. Very clever indeed!
 

Grands Ballets Canadiens – Projection holographique et performance artistique—Holographic projection and stage performance from Lucion Média on Vimeo.

Pixel – extraits from Adrien M / Claire B on Vimeo.

I just love the work of choreographer Mourad Merzouki and his dance troop Company Kafig. I was lucky enough to see their show “Agwa” last year in Boston and I SO wish PIXEL was coming to Montréal!

bund_tree_concert_1

bund_tree_concert_2

I simply loved this project! It’s clever, aesthetically interesting and extremely effective.

BUND (Friends of the Earth Germany) ran a unique charity concert in Berlin to raise awareness of the 15,000 trees the city had lost over the last few years. A nearly 100-year-old chestnut tree was transformed into a street musician and played music for the preservation of all his fellow trees. When the first chestnut in the Berlin park of Monbijou began to fall in early September 2012, a construction of membranes installed underneath the tree translated the bounce of every chestnut into sound sequences. In a harmonious concert with the wind and the creaking of the tree, a unique organic sound composition was created. Visitors were invited to listen to the concert and donate to the cause. If someone sent in his donation and name by text, the tree would thank the donor through a personal greeting that appeared on the membrane. Online donors also received an exclusive download track. The Tree Concert lasted for one week (17-23 September, 2012) and after the concert, Berlin DJ star Robot Koch produced a remix which continues to raise funds.

The project was created by BBDO Proximity Berlin, Ketchum (PR), and a creative pool of artists from the Gang of Berlin. The campaign won a Gold Design Lion at Cannes International Festival of Creativity.
Location: Monbijoupark, Berlin, Germany

 

Rubber Duck Floats in his Global Bathtub

Rubber Duck Floats in his Global Bathtub

Some years ago, my fav prankster pals and I kidnapped our friend’s rubber duck and set our prank wheels in motion. The Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman takes our duckie caper to a whole new level.

This larger than life 16.5-meter-high (54 feet) rubber duck has travelled to 13 different cities in nine countries ranging from Brazil to Australia. In an interview in Hong Kong, Hofman talks about the project and his mission.

“It has a message. Bring joy, connect and look, you know. Don’t forget to look in life. Sometimes we’re too stressed. We go too fast and we forget to breathe life and take life as it comes. You have to enjoy it and look because looking is very important. It makes people communicate.”

Not only does the duck conjure up Sesame Street classic hits and childhood nostalgia, but it’s bound to put a smile on the face of even the most austere passer-by. The bird is currently floating on Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbor. Next up? It’s headed for the land of red, white and blue. It’s all hush hush on the exact destination, but it should be announced next week. In the wake of recent gun legislation and some rather trigger happy politicians of ours (yes, Sarah Palin, you make the team), my only caveat is that we might want to add a gigantic “No Hunting!” sign on the side of this waterfowl. Over and out.

Rubber Duck in Hong Kong

Rubber Duck in Hong Kong

Rubber Duck in Hong Kong

Rubber Duck in Hong Kong

Link to a video on Bloomberg TV