Archives for category: Architecture
Art of Cities Conference, Vancouver, May 24-26, 2017 (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Art of Cities Conference, Vancouver, May 24-26, 2017 (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Had a fantastic visit with CityStudio to learn how their innovation hub is collaborating with City staff, faculty, students, and community to co-create experimental projects to make Vancouver a more sustainable and enjoyable city. A big thank you to the CityStudio founders Duane Elverum and Janet Moore, the CityStudio staff, students and alum, as well as the University Faculty members and City staff for sharing your stories and giving us such a warm welcome to Vancouver.

Jeanie Morton, Janet Moore and Duane Elverum share their story. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Jeanie Morton, Janet Moore and Duane Elverum share their story. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Many fruitful group discussions during the Art of Cities Conference in Vancouver. (Photo: CityStudio)

Many group discussions during the Art of Cities Conference in Vancouver. (Photo: CityStudio)

Jeanie Morton explains how she plays matchmaker between CityStudio, Faculty, City staff, Community organizations and students. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Jeanie Morton explains how she plays matchmaker between CityStudio, Faculty, City staff, Community organizations and students. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson gave us a warm welcome. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson gave us a warm welcome. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson shows his support for how  CityStudio is enhancing the city of Vancouver. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson shows his support for how CityStudio is enhancing the city of Vancouver. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Lisa Helps of Victoria also came out to show her support. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Lisa Helps of Victoria also came out to show her support. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Small break-out group discussions to share ideas. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Small break-out group discussions to share ideas. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Lunch meetings with City staff and University faculty to discuss their involvement with CityStudio. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Lunch meetings with City staff and University faculty to discuss their collaborative projects with CityStudio. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Learning from one another in break-out sessions. (Photo: CityStudio)

Learning from one another in break-out sessions. (Photo: CityStudio)

The City of Vancouver treated us to a tour of their new bike lanes. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

The City of Vancouver treated us to a tour of their new bike lanes. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Dale Bracewell, Manager of Transportation Planning, gave us an overview of Vancouver's walking and cycling goals. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Dale Bracewell, Manager of Transportation Planning, gave us an overview of Vancouver’s walking and cycling goals. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Great to be at a conference where you take a break to experience the city on two wheels! (Photo: CityStudio)

Great to be at a conference where you take a break to experience the city on two wheels! (Photo: CityStudio)

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Sandstorm by Marco Casagrande, Photo by Nikita Wu

Really nice use of natural light in this architectural installation by Marco Casagrande in Wenduine, Belgium. For more info and photos, check out this article in ArchDaily.

 

Since a bit more than one fourth of the Netherlands is below sea level, we often forget how human interventions and machines (dams, pumps, etc.) have changed the natural landscape and altered the interaction between people and nature. Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde and his team at Studio Roosegaarde created Waterlicht, an installation of wavy lines of light composed of LEDs, software, lenses and steam machines to create a virtual flood and simulate waves and currents passing overhead. The installation is an interesting reminder of the delicate and constantly evolving interaction between humans and nature.

Waterlicht has been on display at the Museumplein from May 11-13, 2015. It was originally commissioned by the Dutch Water Board and was previously displayed in the flood channel of the River IJssel near Westervoort.

WaterLicht

The Future is Cities

The Future is Cities


I’m glad we’re moving more toward sharing and co-ownership of possessions slowly but surely (Uber, AirBnB, Bixi/Hubway, co-working spaces, etc.). It’s a win win for society and the planet without a doubt. As stats show, our cities will be accommodating exponentially larger population as we move forward and the numbers are only expected to continue to climb. Since we can teach our toddlers to get past the “Mine!” phase, I’m confident that we can too. Here’s a good read: The Future is Cities.

Winter Sun

Winter_Sun_2

Winter_Sun_3

Montrealers may well appreciate this type of installation smack dab in the middle of January or February (or even April at the rate we’re going). The following text is from the site inhabitat (Winter Sun art installation brings warmth and light to King’s Cross in London, by Lucy Wang, 12/08/14)

“Artists James Bowthorpe and Kim Coleman collaborated with architect Andrew Lock to design Winter Sun, a ‘hearth’-like art installation that doubles as a public gathering space with an open-air bar. The temporary structure illuminates the area with twelve glowing ‘suns’ that change brightness to emulate natural light.

An open-air bar located at the heart of the structure serves up hot and cold cocktails made from locally-sourced ingredients such as honey and winter fruits. Everything from the design of the bar to the uniforms fit the sunlight concept and was created using exposed light-sensitive materials.

“Humans used to celebrate mid-winter as the time of the year when the earth is furthest from the sun, anticipating its glorious return,” say the designers. “Winter Sun is a dose of man-made sun in the dark of winter.” The twelve glowing lights surrounding the public space endlessly dim and brighten to emulate the sun at different phases, such as daybreak or full sun. The installation was accompanied with a series of small themed events including Sun Printing and Shadow Shape making.”

bund_tree_concert_1

bund_tree_concert_2

I simply loved this project! It’s clever, aesthetically interesting and extremely effective.

BUND (Friends of the Earth Germany) ran a unique charity concert in Berlin to raise awareness of the 15,000 trees the city had lost over the last few years. A nearly 100-year-old chestnut tree was transformed into a street musician and played music for the preservation of all his fellow trees. When the first chestnut in the Berlin park of Monbijou began to fall in early September 2012, a construction of membranes installed underneath the tree translated the bounce of every chestnut into sound sequences. In a harmonious concert with the wind and the creaking of the tree, a unique organic sound composition was created. Visitors were invited to listen to the concert and donate to the cause. If someone sent in his donation and name by text, the tree would thank the donor through a personal greeting that appeared on the membrane. Online donors also received an exclusive download track. The Tree Concert lasted for one week (17-23 September, 2012) and after the concert, Berlin DJ star Robot Koch produced a remix which continues to raise funds.

The project was created by BBDO Proximity Berlin, Ketchum (PR), and a creative pool of artists from the Gang of Berlin. The campaign won a Gold Design Lion at Cannes International Festival of Creativity.
Location: Monbijoupark, Berlin, Germany

 

The Giant of Boston

“The Giant of Boston” at the Rose Kennedy Greenway at Dewey Square, Boston

“The Giant of Boston” adding color to the financial district

If you have been near South Station in Boston recently, you may have done a double take when you spotted a burst of color wedged between the landscape of skyscrapers. This is the handy work of Otavio and Gustavo Pandolfo, better known by their collective name, Os Gemeos (the Portuguese word for “twins”). These two brothers have been bringing their unique style of graffiti from their native Sao Paulo, Brazil to cities around the globe for several decades, and they currently have a solo show at the ICA in Boston. I just went and it’s definitely worth seeing.

This massive 70 x 70 foot mural on the side of a “Big Dig” ventilation building has surely been met with mixed reviews. Whatever the case, I’m a Fan (capital “F”) and please see their body of work before jumping to any conclusions. Not only does the piece add personality and color to a rather stark landscape, but it stimulates conversation and brings up all kinds of interesting social commentary (the good, the bad and the ugly).

Their visual style is very distinctive. It feels like Dr. Seuss meets Beavis and Butthead with a twist of surrealism and Brazilian jazz hands. The twins are often very inspired by their dreams and the part I found especially fascinating is that they actually often share the same dreams. Say what? How is that physically possible? Neurologists and psychologists, please jump in here.

I quite like their style and am posting a handful of pics and a video for you to enjoy.

Tagged chimney by Os Gemeos

Os Gemeos public art in Chelsea, NYC (320 West 21st Street)

Os Gemeos public art in Chelsea, NYC (320 West 21st Street)

The first thing that popped into mind at the sight of these murals……..United Nations golf pants! Ralph Lauren, are you listening?

Os Gemeos art at Revere Hotel on Stuart Street, Boston

Os Gemeos Painting

Os Gemeos Installation

Os Gemeos Installation

 

ICA show: http://www.icaboston.org/exhibitions/exhibit/os_gemeos

OK, I don’t want to freak my NYC peeps out, but I had to share this video. I thought it was a great use of storytelling, visuals and data to make the issue of carbon emissions a lot more tangible and real. It’s tough to duck or hide from those heaping mounds of blue bubbles piling one on top of the other at alarming rates.

The good news? Many people are consciously changing their behaviors related to purchase decisions, energy consumption and transport choices, and governments and cities are rethinking how we structure urban environments. However, we clearly have lots of opportunities to make improvements for the future.

NYC's Greenhouse Gas Emissions

A single hour’s emissions from New York City: 6,204 one-tonne spheres

For more info on the video: http://ht.ly/eUKLn

Aerial view of the proposed AZC bridge in Paris

Bouncing pedestrians on the AZC proposed bridge in Paris

AZC proposed bridge in Paris

Sketch of the AZC proposed bridge in Paris

AZC proposed bridge in Paris

Backflip on the AZC proposed bridge

Landscape view of the AZC proposed bridge

No, this is not a set design proposal for Amelie Poulain’s next magical adventure in Paris or an idea dreamt up by a bunch of Disneyland Paris imagineers after one too many pichets of vino. It is the architecture firm Atelier Züdel Cristea’s (AZC) proposed design for an inflatable trampoline bridge across the Seine. The concept won 3rd prize in the Archtriumph 2012 contest of ideas design competition, and the bridge would be constructed from giant PVC rings inflated with more than 130,00 cubic feet of air and 100 feet of trampolines stretching across the surface.

As a former gymnast, my eyes lit up at the thought of somersaulting my way across the Seine and seeing the landscape right side up and upside down. Fun? Absolutely! Realistic for pedestrians of all ages and physical condition? Hmmm…..ummm….The firm mentioned that the perimeter buoys are designed to prevent any dismounts into the river below, accidental or otherwise, and guard rails are included on the walkways between the trampolines. However, my lawyer friends would likely shutter at the liability for the city on this one.

Whatever the case, it’s surely a super fun concept and I’d gladly volunteer to test out the prototype. I love envisioning this built in the 19th century, where you’d hear Napoleon shouting to his brigade, “Come on men, let’s bounce!”

 

 

I snapped a few pics of the swings in action.

As the lights go down, the swings get their glow on.

Swings are for all ages.

I was at a creative conference in Montreal and I couldn’t resist going to check out this public art experiment I’d heard about at La Place des Arts. The project was designed by the company Daily Tous Les Jours and several partners. With the help of Luc-Alain Giraldeau, an animal behaviour professor, they explored the topic of cooperation. The idea was based on the principle that together, people achieve better things than separately.

The result was a giant collective instrument made of 21 musical swings; each swing in motion triggered different notes and all the swings together composed a piece. Some sounds only emerged from cooperation. This project brought together people of all ages and backgrounds, and made great use of a public space where people were generally standing waiting for public buses. Loved the concept!