Archives for category: Social Impact
Art of Cities Conference, Vancouver, May 24-26, 2017 (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Art of Cities Conference, Vancouver, May 24-26, 2017 (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Had a fantastic visit with CityStudio to learn how their innovation hub is collaborating with City staff, faculty, students, and community to co-create experimental projects to make Vancouver a more sustainable and enjoyable city. A big thank you to the CityStudio founders Duane Elverum and Janet Moore, the CityStudio staff, students and alum, as well as the University Faculty members and City staff for sharing your stories and giving us such a warm welcome to Vancouver.

Jeanie Morton, Janet Moore and Duane Elverum share their story. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Jeanie Morton, Janet Moore and Duane Elverum share their story. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Many fruitful group discussions during the Art of Cities Conference in Vancouver. (Photo: CityStudio)

Many group discussions during the Art of Cities Conference in Vancouver. (Photo: CityStudio)

Jeanie Morton explains how she plays matchmaker between CityStudio, Faculty, City staff, Community organizations and students. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Jeanie Morton explains how she plays matchmaker between CityStudio, Faculty, City staff, Community organizations and students. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson gave us a warm welcome. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson gave us a warm welcome. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson shows his support for how  CityStudio is enhancing the city of Vancouver. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Gregor Robertson shows his support for how CityStudio is enhancing the city of Vancouver. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Lisa Helps of Victoria also came out to show her support. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Mayor Lisa Helps of Victoria also came out to show her support. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Small break-out group discussions to share ideas. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Small break-out group discussions to share ideas. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Lunch meetings with City staff and University faculty to discuss their involvement with CityStudio. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Lunch meetings with City staff and University faculty to discuss their collaborative projects with CityStudio. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Learning from one another in break-out sessions. (Photo: CityStudio)

Learning from one another in break-out sessions. (Photo: CityStudio)

The City of Vancouver treated us to a tour of their new bike lanes. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

The City of Vancouver treated us to a tour of their new bike lanes. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Dale Bracewell, Manager of Transportation Planning, gave us an overview of Vancouver's walking and cycling goals. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Dale Bracewell, Manager of Transportation Planning, gave us an overview of Vancouver’s walking and cycling goals. (Photo: Christine Kerrigan)

Great to be at a conference where you take a break to experience the city on two wheels! (Photo: CityStudio)

Great to be at a conference where you take a break to experience the city on two wheels! (Photo: CityStudio)

Since a bit more than one fourth of the Netherlands is below sea level, we often forget how human interventions and machines (dams, pumps, etc.) have changed the natural landscape and altered the interaction between people and nature. Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde and his team at Studio Roosegaarde created Waterlicht, an installation of wavy lines of light composed of LEDs, software, lenses and steam machines to create a virtual flood and simulate waves and currents passing overhead. The installation is an interesting reminder of the delicate and constantly evolving interaction between humans and nature.

Waterlicht has been on display at the Museumplein from May 11-13, 2015. It was originally commissioned by the Dutch Water Board and was previously displayed in the flood channel of the River IJssel near Westervoort.

WaterLicht

The Future is Cities

The Future is Cities


I’m glad we’re moving more toward sharing and co-ownership of possessions slowly but surely (Uber, AirBnB, Bixi/Hubway, co-working spaces, etc.). It’s a win win for society and the planet without a doubt. As stats show, our cities will be accommodating exponentially larger population as we move forward and the numbers are only expected to continue to climb. Since we can teach our toddlers to get past the “Mine!” phase, I’m confident that we can too. Here’s a good read: The Future is Cities.

Nick Cave Sculpture

Nick Cave Sculpture

A recent trip to the Peabody Essex Museum led me to stumbling into some of Nick Cave’s sculpture and video projects. Wow, someone who loves color explosions and urban interventions as much as I do? Yups. Only a few days later, I serendipitously bumped into more of his work in NYC. Unfortunately I’d only just missed his exhibit called, “Heard NY,” which took place in Grand Central Station and was a collaboration between Nick Cave, Alvin Ailey dancers, Creative Time and MTA Arts for Transit. I can’t imagine how unexpectedly running into a rainbow of prancing horses in the middle of a daily commute wouldn’t put a smile on the face of just about anyone, no matter what kind of day you’re having. Thumbs up for artistic urban interventions!

Nick Cave Sculptures

Nick Cave Sculptures

Nick Cave Sculptures

Nick Cave Sculptures

A project called “Tree Philly” is looking to Citizenvestor for seed money

We’ve all heard of crowdfunding, so nothing new there. However, crowdfunding for public works projects? Interesting…Citizinvestor is a start-up that is connecting municipalities and citizens to fund public work projects of their choice. Municipalities submit projects and citizens also have the opportunity to petition for new projects as well. I’m curious to see how this concept pans out and I may have to test it out first hand.

Radio Boston aired a spot on crowdfunding public works projects: http://radioboston.wbur.org/2012/11/06/crowdfunding

Citizinvestor: http://www.citizinvestor.com

OK, I don’t want to freak my NYC peeps out, but I had to share this video. I thought it was a great use of storytelling, visuals and data to make the issue of carbon emissions a lot more tangible and real. It’s tough to duck or hide from those heaping mounds of blue bubbles piling one on top of the other at alarming rates.

The good news? Many people are consciously changing their behaviors related to purchase decisions, energy consumption and transport choices, and governments and cities are rethinking how we structure urban environments. However, we clearly have lots of opportunities to make improvements for the future.

NYC's Greenhouse Gas Emissions

A single hour’s emissions from New York City: 6,204 one-tonne spheres

For more info on the video: http://ht.ly/eUKLn

 

 

I snapped a few pics of the swings in action.

As the lights go down, the swings get their glow on.

Swings are for all ages.

I was at a creative conference in Montreal and I couldn’t resist going to check out this public art experiment I’d heard about at La Place des Arts. The project was designed by the company Daily Tous Les Jours and several partners. With the help of Luc-Alain Giraldeau, an animal behaviour professor, they explored the topic of cooperation. The idea was based on the principle that together, people achieve better things than separately.

The result was a giant collective instrument made of 21 musical swings; each swing in motion triggered different notes and all the swings together composed a piece. Some sounds only emerged from cooperation. This project brought together people of all ages and backgrounds, and made great use of a public space where people were generally standing waiting for public buses. Loved the concept!